Crowd Cow Blog • May 11th, 2016 • Read 606 times • 2 min read

Wagyu Cooking Guide

Bolek S.
Creating a simple, affordable way for everyone to enjoy the quality and variety of independent farms
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Wagyu is quite simply the very best beef. We've put together this cooking guide to help you get the most out of your Wagyu experience.

UPDATE: For A5 Wagyu from Japan, we have prepared a very special preparation guide: How to Prepare and Enjoy A5 Wagyu

The goal is to experience a quality piece of meat for what it is. A quality meat has the characteristics and profiles by which people struggle to find the right words to describe. We're here to help you prepare your Wagyu and achieve that "eye-rolling" bite we all strive for.

We've selected three recipes to elevate (not overpower, mask, or distract) this quality meat. For example, you will taste how the acid from a "distant" cherry glaze complements the viscous taste of a braised shanks, or how the combination of brown butter and salt amplifies your dance with the texture of a sous vide tenderloin. In all, we find that cooking with less doesn't mean compromising the quality beef we source.

To Thaw or Not to Thaw

Since delicate intra-muscular fat that Wagyu is known for melts at room temperature, you must take care when thawing it. The best way to thaw frozen Wagyu is by leaving it overnight
in the fridge. Although it may not be the fastest way (compared to submerging it in cool water + changing the water every 30 minutes), the longevity of this process allows for an even thaw and in turn, keeps the food out of the 'danger zone' (40F-140F).

Tip: Keep the beef in the coldest part of the fridge. This allows the 'complex' fats (the good stuff) to hold together longer during the rendering phase in a gentle cooking process.

Some argue cooking meat from frozen minimizes overall moisture loss, reduces the 'grey-band' surface around the desired center, and locks in the complex fats. Other critics disagree adding that you also compromise a quality texture in the meat. Try and see what you prefer.

The Perfect Tenderloin Sous Vide
  • 1 ea 6 oz Beef Tenderloin
  • 1 ea Thyme Sprig
  • Salt, Fleur de sel
  • Mixed Ground Pepper
  • Brown Butter

Season beef with salt and cryovac with thyme sprig. Cook in water bath at 62C for 18 to 20 minutes until just medium.

Remove from bag, pat dry, (if you have it) top with scooped marrow and broil until evenly browned.

Rest 1 minute, slice, brush with brown butter, season with fleur de sel and pepper.

Enjoy.

Braised Shanks with Glazed Sour Cherries
  • 1/2 lb Shanks
  • 600g White balsamic vinegar
  • 50b Soy sauce
  • 300g Cherry puree
  • 20 Sour cherries
  • 1 cup Red Wine
  • 2 cups Beef Bone Broth
  • 0.5 lbs Onion and carrot mix (even)
  • Salt to taste
  • Butter as needed

Combine the white balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, and cherry puree in a small pot. Bring to a boil and strain. Cool over ice.

Sear Shanks with oil in a rondeau until a deep golden brown. Remove meat from pan and discard the fat.

Add onions and carrots to the rondeau and cook until they sweat.

Deglaze with red wine and strained cherry juice and reduce au sec.

Add the seared shanks back to the rondeau as well as the bone broth.

Let simmer for 15 minutes, add sour cherries, and cover.

Cook until meat falls apart.

Finish braising liquid with 1 Tbl of butter if preferred.

Enjoy.

New York Strip Steak Tar Tar
  • 4oz New York Strip Steak, chopped very fine
  • 1/2 tsp White truffle oil
  • 2 tbl Shallot, very finely minced
  • 1 tsp Fresh chives, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp Lemon juice (incl. some zest)
  • 1 Quail egg yolk
  • TT Sea salt & fresh ground pepper

Add beef, oil, shallots, lemon juice/zest, and chives in bowl. Mix.

Season with sea salt and pepper to taste.

Garnish with quail egg yolk.

Enjoy.

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