Other cuts:

Brisket (Flat)

The Brisket Point and Flat are coveted pieces of meat, since there are only two full Brisket sections (each section containing the point and flat). They are the cuts from the breast section on both sides near the tender rib meat. A beautiful outer ‘fat cap’ surrounds the meat, making it ideal for barbecuing. The Brisket is two parts: the Point and the Flat. The Flat is the portion attached around the rib cage, whereas the Point sits off the end and ‘over ‘it, making up the surface nearest to the sternum area by the forefront legs. The Flat cut is rectangular in shape, with a distinct layer of meat and fat running across the entire cut making it very consistent and easy to work with. The Point (sometimes referred as “Deckle”) has a similar shape, though its sides curve to a point to one end.

The Brisket is used most commonly for smoking and barbecuing. When cooking, the goal is for the spice rub to caramelize with the meat’s glistening maillard process, and for the fat to aid the brisket to cook through while keeping it moist, tender, and very juicy. To achieve a fork tender consistency, marinade the meat, season with a wet or dry rub, or simply smoke and cook it naked with a bit more control in heat distribution. Popular recipes for the Brisket include making it into a Pastrami, Texas Burnt Ends, and Corned Beef.

Recipes for Brisket (Flat)

Slow-Cooked Italian Brisket

Garlic cloves and tomato paste put an Italian flair on a classic brisket preparation.

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St. Patrick's Day Corned Beef

Celebrate Irish heritage with this classic corned beef recipe. A long brining period yields a spicy and tangy corned beef that slices up beautifully.

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Smoked Brisket With Peppercorn Crust

Course-ground peppercorns give this wood-smoked, slow-brined brisket a spicy, bold kick.

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Sunday Night Pot Roast

Robust red wine and aromatic herbs are slow cooked with hearty brisket for a Sunday night (or any night) meal you'll love.

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Oven-Smoked Pastrami

You can enjoy the deep, woodsy flavor of smoked brisket even without a smoker. Wood chips, a deep roasting pan, and aluminum foil come together to make your oven a makeshift smoker.

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